Planting Tips and Fall plant picks

It is officially fall now, the temperatures have cooled down and our steady west coast rain is back. Our long drought seems like a distant memory now…except if you are noticing your cedar hedge is slowly dying off!!

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Cedars were hit hard with our long dry period this spring and summer. I have seen lots of new cedars that were planted in the spring that just couldn’t make it through the summer with water restrictions. Even mature, established cedars have struggled.

It seems to be the year of replacing cedars! There is not much to be done but to start over. There are a few instances where I have seen newer cedars that have died that were not planted that well, so this does not help them when the stress of a drought hits them. Improper planting can already put your new hedge at risk.

Here are a few planting tips to make sure you are helping your new cedars or any plant for that matter:

  1. Proper planting depth – Always make sure you are planting at the appropriate depth. Measure root balls as you dig. Place the cedar in the hole – check the depth. Your root ball should be level with the surrounding ground. Don’t plant too high  AND don’t plant too deep. High root balls dry out faster and buried trunks will rot and die.
  2. Proper spacing – Make sure you are giving your new hedge the right amount of space to grow. If plants are planted too close together , they will compete for nutrients and crowd each other out in no time.
  3. Amend the soil – Make sure that you are adding some compost and/or fresh soil to the planting holes. Mix it in with the existing soil and place the root ball in the hole. Back fill with new and existing soil.
  4. Add bone meal for good root development.
  5. Water – Make sure you soak the whole root ball before fully covering with soil. Let the water sit and drain away. Then finish back-filling around the root ball with soil. Water again once you have finished planting and set up a specific watering schedule. Write it down so you don’t forget. Try to stick to it. Plants that have taller trees around them will not get as much water from rain , so need to be watered by hand more often. Always check soil moisture by just putting you fingers into the soil. Get to know your soil, and water accordingly.
  6. Mulching – Add a 2 inch layer of mulch around your new plants after planting. Composted bark mulch is a good option. Don’t bury the trunk but have a nice layer to assist in keeping the soil from drying out. This can really help during dry periods.

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Fall is also a great time for planting. Why not think about adding some new plants that can add some fall interest to your garden? Why do spring and summer gardens get all the focus? Why do autumn and winter gardens seem to be more of an afterthought?

Sometimes people feel that fall is the time to “shut down” the garden. Put all the tools away, clean up and say goodbye to the season. Then they don’t look out the window until the bulbs start in the spring….How sad!! There is an abundance of interest in the garden at this time of year that can extend the season into December!

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It is a trans-formative time in the garden with beautiful foliage colours, berries and textures. We are lucky on the west coast to have mostly mild falls and winters. But even gardeners in cooler climates can extend the season as well.

A garden isn’t just interesting because of “flowers”. Don’t get me wrong – blooms are beautiful and are a dynamic part of any garden. Although there are some flowering perennials that can extend the season into the fall , we really need to look at plants that have more then just “flowers”. Fall should be a time to explode your garden with striking fall foliage, beautiful berries and fiery fruit, showy seed heads and bodacious bark!

20151001_100058The trick is to look for perennials , shrubs and trees that offer multi-season interest. Flower, form and foliage – this is a good recipe to follow to extend the interest into fall and winter. Plants that hold this triple threat in their arsenal will be sure to extend the time you can enjoy your garden –  Here are a few of my favourites :

  • Trees – Coral bark maple ; Paperbark maple; Dogwoods

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Paperbark maple – Bark

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Paperbark maple – fall colour

  • Shrubs- Summersweet (Clethra); Berberis; Smokebush( cotinus); Burning Bush; Hydrangeas; Ninebark(physocarpus); Fothergilla; Viburnum; Callicarpa (beauty berry); contoneaster

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Hydrangea Limelight and anenome                           Fothergilla – fall colour

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Fothergilla – spring flowers

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Viburnum ‘Brandywine’                                           Beauty berry and sedum

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Contaneaster

  • Perennials- Echinacea; Fall aster; Black eyed susan (rudbeckia); Sedum; Solidago (goldenrod); Russian sage

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Sedum autumn joy                                                           Fall aster

  • Ornamental grasses – Miscanthus; Little Bluestem; Japanese Blood grass; Carex evergold; Molina

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Miscanthus                                                  Little Bluestem, Rudbeckia, sedum

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Japanese Blood grass, carex evergold

Enjoy playing with plants to bring some 4 season interest to your garden. Have fun and get outside!

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